Monthly Archives:March 2016

The 10 toughest interview questions revealed (and how to answer them)

31 Mar 16
alibhai
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  • Do you know the answer to this: How do you get an elephant in the fridge?
  • Could you reply to this: If you were a fruit, what kind would you be?

How do you prepare for a job interview? Researching the company? Working out your strengths and weaknesses? Or trying to predict what kind of questions you might be asked?

Along with the ‘Where do you see yourself in five years?’ and ‘What will you bring to the company?’ type questions, have you ever considered what you would say if asked – If you were a fruit what fruit would you be?’

If not, we’ve compiled a short list of the top 10 weirdest and toughest interview questions that have been asked by employers in the UK.

Would you be able to tell your potential new employer how you would fit an elephant into a fridge?

Would you be able to tell your potential new employer how you would fit an elephant into a fridge?

The list has been compiled with information from tens of thousands of employees on the jobs and careers website Glassdoor.

It covers a wide-range of industries and along with the hardest questions asked, employees have also shared tips on how to give the right answer and land your next job.

Read the questions below, with details of which companies asked them, and then check at the bottom for the best ways to answer. 

The ten toughest interview questions 

1. ‘Which magic power would you like to have?’

Asked by Topshop, Portsmouth, to a sales assistant candidate

2. ‘If you were a fruit, what kind would you be and why?’

Asked by TopdeskTravel, London, to a trip leader candidate 

3. ‘If you could have dinner with three actors that are no longer living, who would you pick?’

Asked by Blackberry, Berkshire, to a commercial director job candidate

4.’How many hours would it take to clean every single window in London?’

Asked by IBM, Portsmouth, to an IT role job candidate

5.’How do you get an elephant in a fridge?’

Asked by Germalto, London, to a software engineer candidate

6. ‘If the time is quarter past three, what is the angle measurement on the clock?’

Asked by Standard Bank Group, London, to a product control lead candidate

7. ‘If you had three minutes alone in a lift with the CEO, what would you say?’

Asked by Network Rail, London, to a management accountant candidate

8. ‘How many people born in 2013 were named Gary?’

Asked by BT, London, to a senior proposition manager candidate

9. ‘What will you be famous for?’

Asked by EY, London, to a director candidate

10. ‘How many nappies are purchased per year in the UK?’

Asked by Aviva, London, to a graduate programme candidate

THE GENIUS ANSWERS TO SECURE YOUR NEXT POSITION

Can you work out how long it would take to clean all the windows in London?

Can you work out how long it would take to clean all the windows in London?

‘Which magic power would you like to have?’

How long is a piece of string? There is no right answer to this and it’s the kind of question that is asked to test how you cope under pressure. 

A power that improves the way you perform at work would be handy – the ability to speak any language or never needing to sleep – but employers will see through this quickly so it’s best to stick to something you truly believe you would like to have – unless you’re an exceptional blagger. 

How many people born in 2013 were named Gary?’

In 2013 there were only 28 babies named Gary out of 700,000 according to the Office of National Statistics.

When the ONS data was published this story hit quite a few headlines so you might have seen it.

If not, and you’ve no idea, guess. The name has been pretty much extinct for the past few years so it’s likely to be low.   

‘If you were a fruit, what kind would you be and why?’

Pineapple, mango or kiwi? Again with this one there’s not really a perfect answer. Instead of picking your favourite, try and go for a fruit you can use to describe your own personality and strengths. 

The reasons you give are more to do with how you can use own experiences and skills to benefit the company rather than what fruit you would pick from the fruit bowl.

‘If you could have dinner with three actors that are no longer living, who would you pick?’

This question is geared up to allow you to talk about people in your life who you might find interesting or inspiring. 

With each actor you choose, think of several examples of how the work they’ve done has influenced or inspired you –  and how you can bring this back to your career.

There were only 28 babies in 2013 called Gary - could you remember this for an interview question? 

There were only 28 babies in 2013 called Gary – could you remember this for an interview question? 

Remember –  if you’re naming people because you think they’ll make you sound intelligent you won’t get anywhere if you’ve just said a name to sound impressive but don’t actually have a clue who they are.

‘How many hours would it take to clean every single window in London?’

To work this out you’ll need a lot longer than the time given in an interview so therefore the answer you give is more to do with how you think about the process of solving the question – rather than coming up with the answer itself.

Add to this the fact buildings are popping up all the time in London, just take the stat last year that 260 new tower blocks were currently planned for the London skyline, and it’s a near-on impossible task to come up with a factually correct reply.

Instead think about how many people there are in London – eight million – and how many businesses – 3 million listed on Companies House for the whole of the UK – and you can start to think about the answer. 

However, when you start factoring in the size of the window and the ability of the window cleaner, you’re on sticky ground.

Replying with an answer on how you would go about finding out an approximate number will work in your favour as it shows how you deal with pressure and problem solving. 

‘How do you get an elephant in a fridge?’

How big is the fridge? 

Approach this one by considering why you would ever need to get an elephant in a fridge. As the reasons are pretty bizarre (unless perhaps you’re a zookeeper?) it’s better to creatively consider it and answer something like – ‘Take the giraffe out first’.

This way you’ve considered the size and practical issues and instead of questioning the action you’re finding a response to it. 

‘If the time is quarter past 3, what is the angle measurement on the clock?’

The answer is 7.5 degrees. As the hour hand moves around the clock every 12 hours and there is 360 degrees in 12 hours or 30 degrees per hour. 

The hour hand points exactly at the 3 at 3 o’clock and when 15 minutes has passed the hour hand will be pointing 7.5 degrees past it. 

Finding out how many nappies are bought each year is more to do with how you work under pressure

Finding out how many nappies are bought each year is more to do with how you work under pressure

‘If you had three minutes alone in a lift with the CEO, what would you say?’

This is not the time for waffling, you’re being asked to give a succinct summary which shows your skills and characteristics and interest in the company you’ may be about to join.

Steer clear from the ‘How did you get where you were’ type questions and go for something which will make you stand out and memorable.  

‘What will you be famous for?’

Solving world peace? Curing cancer? Go for something you truly believe in which you can also link back to the benefit of the company.   

‘How many nappies are purchased per year in the UK?’

Unless you work at Pampers it’s unlikely you’ll be able to pull this one out of your sleeve. You could make a rough estimate by approximating the birth rate, and how many a baby would need every day and go from there. 






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

How you can earn decent money… by using your body!

31 Mar 16
alibhai
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You can make money by investing in an Isa or a pension. Or you can go down a more unorthodox route and lend out your body – or parts of it – to help others and make yourself an income.

Here, The Mail on Sunday explores a wide range of options: from being a human guinea pig, selling locks of hair to modelling for others.

Susie Mason is a life model who has been immortalised in hundreds of paintings and even a bronze statue

Susie Mason is a life model who has been immortalised in hundreds of paintings and even a bronze statue

Become a hand or leg model  

You do not have to possess the catwalk appeal of Cara Delevingne to be a top model. You can make a good living from just modelling hands and legs.

Hand models are particularly sought- after for advertising campaigns – handling the goods that are being promoted. When used in TV work, you can earn between £850 and £5,000 a day. 

If your hands are used in print advertising you can be paid between £350 and £500 for posing for photographs.

Siobhan Priest, 30, from Balham in South West London, enjoys a successful career modelling her hands, lips and legs for advertising campaigns.

The married mother of one says: ‘I have a naturally slim shape. Although I am just under six foot and wear size ten or 12 clothes, I am perhaps not slim enough to be a catwalk supermodel.

‘But when modelling body parts, advertising firms often prefer more shape and want people like me who look more like those who buy their goods.’

Pin model: Siobhan Priest earns a good living modelling her legs

Siobhan considers herself as not quite slim enough to be a catwalk model but enjoys a successful career modelling body parts

Pin model: Siobhan Priest earns a good living modelling her legs, feet and hands (left in an ad shoot)

Although spotted by a modelling talent scout as a teenager, Siobhan said it was not until she signed up to a body agency specialising in hands, feet, legs, eyes and lips that she embarked on this unusual but successful career.

She says: ‘It is great being able to turn up with hair scraped back and not wearing any make-up – knowing all they are going to focus on are your feet, legs or hands. 

‘I go to the gym and work out to try to keep toned but for hand, foot and lip modelling it is often just good luck. Anyone interested should contact a specialist agency to see if they have what it takes.’

You need to look after your limbs as a model but blemishes such as temporary bruising can often be airbrushed from the photo. 

With hands, nails need to be kept trim and well manicured. Long, straight fingers with smooth skin will help get hands into adverts – not freckles or moles.

Bernadette Vong, 36, from St Neots, Cambridgeshire, has been modelling hands for a decade. She says: ‘You would be surprised how vital hands are for advertising. Some are more suitable for promoting beauty products while others have a professional business appeal. 

‘Mine are most used for promoting technology, such as phones – making gadgets look easy to handle. My hands have even appeared in Vogue.’ 

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Body part modelling agencies include Hired Hands (020 7267 9212); hiredhandsmodels.com; and BMA Models (01442 878 878), bmamodels.com. 

Pose for art

Work as a life model – posing for artists – is not for the bashful as most of the time it involves being studied naked. 

But if you are not prudish and are able to sit for a few hours without fidgeting, it can be a financially rewarding pursuit.

You not only help artists with their art and sculpture projects but it can also earn you a few pounds. A life model can expect to be paid £15 an hour to be an art muse – so a full day of modelling might earn you £120.

Susie Mason, 48, from Elmbridge, Surrey, is a freelance life model who has been immortalised in hundreds of paintings and even a bronze statue.

She says: ‘Modelling is rewarding as you are always surrounded by talented people. There is also an element of vanity as you are being used in works of art that will be around forever.’

But Susie warns it is not just about lying around. She works out to give herself sufficient stamina to hold certain positions and does regular weight training. 

Work of art? If you are not prudish, posing as for artists can be a financially rewarding pursuit

Work of art? If you are not prudish, posing as for artists can be a financially rewarding pursuit

The married mother of two says: ‘It can be gruelling holding the same pose for four hours or more. You also need to keep the mind focused on remaining still.’

Susie says her work is varied – everything from sitting for a group of art students in a college studio for a couple of hours in an evening to posing for an individual artist over several days.

Contrary to what many people think, shape or age are no barrier to being a successful model. In fact, sagging breasts, Caesarean scars for women, and balding pot-bellied men can add to artistic appeal.

Figurative artists like to practice drawing people of all ages, shapes and sizes. Rachel McCarthy runs the Register of Artists’ Models and at 58 is an art model herself. 

She says: ‘The first rule for any aspiring model is punctuality. You cannot be late when doing a sitting for others. An ability to sit still – and let your mind drift – is also essential.’

Being a life model is usually a part-time occupation as work is not regular – and initially you must be patient as it can take time to build up a reputation.

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Anyone interested in becoming a life model can contact the Register of Artists’ Models. 

Details are available at website Modelreg.co.uk. It charges £38.50 as a subscription to be listed on its website while artists pay £10 a year to find models.

Be a medical guinea pig

Every drug that is either sold across the counter at a pharmacy or prescribed by the doctor needs to have been rigorously tested first.

By the time it gets to so-called human guinea pigs it has already been through countless other examinations – including animal testing.

For any clinical trial to go ahead it has to be proven that the drug is safe for humans – and must be rubber stamped by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). 

Medical trials are held at private and NHS-supported clinics across Britain. These include everything from flu tests to drugs that combat conditions such as heart disease and cancers.

Volunteers usually have to be in good physical shape and aged between 18 and 65. They must go through an initial screening that less than half pass. 

Accommodation is good but not five-star luxury. If on a flu trial you may get your own room with en-suite bathroom, TV and computer games console.

Volunteers usually have to be in good physical shape and aged between 18 and 65

Volunteers usually have to be in good physical shape and aged between 18 and 65

You will also be fed for free as part of the deal – but unfortunately you could be trapped inside the medical treatment complex for a week or more. 

Fees vary depending on the nature of the test. A company such as FluCamp might pay around £3,000 for a 12-day stay at its research centre.

You get an influenza virus that is inhaled through the nose followed up with tests in isolation – including the taking of urine and blood samples plus having your heart monitored with an electrocardiogram. 

There is also a follow-up check three weeks after leaving.

Other companies that do medical trials include Covance. It offers a range of treatments at its centre in Leeds – paying from £750 for a three-night stopover and a couple of follow-up visits. 

Sabine Schneidern, a spokeswoman for Covance, says: ‘We have volunteers who do the trials for a range of reasons – not just the money. For example, we have nurses who take part because they know the important value of the work being done.’

She adds: ‘You often do not even feel you are taking the drug. Side effects are nearly always minor as the drugs have already been rigorously tested. And you can end the trial whenever you like.’

Those afraid of needles should think twice before signing up – as regular blood samples are often taken. 

You must also accept that boredom can play a role as you may have to stay in a complex for weeks – though a good pile of books can help alleviate this.

FURTHER INFORMATION 

Donate sperm or eggs

For a man aged between 18 and 40 sperm donation offers an opportunity to help those with fertility problems who wish to have children.

There are several sperm donation bank outlets across Britain – run by both NHS and private fertility clinics – but it is important only to use a provider that is licensed by the Human Fertilisation & Embry- ology Authority.

Donors can expect to receive £35 plus expenses for every visit they make to a sperm bank.

When you have donated, your identity is not given to the recipient, but once any conceived child reaches the age of 18 they have a right to find out who you are – though the sperm donor will not appear on any birth certificate or be able to make any contact with the child. 

This rule only applies to children born by donation from April 2005.

Only a minority of men are approved by sperm banks. If accepted you may be asked to give two samples a week for up to six months – with total payments often capped at £750.

Donors can expect to receive £35 plus expenses for every visit they make to a sperm bank

Donors can expect to receive £35 plus expenses for every visit they make to a sperm bank

You must abstain from sex for at least three days before each visit. Donors provide samples in private rooms at the clinics. The containers are then immediately handed over to laboratory staff.

A spokesperson for the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority says: ‘You should not be motivated by money if you are interested in becoming a donor. It is an altruistic act that in some cases offers the only hope for couples with fertility problems. It is not a decision to be taken lightly.’

The Birmingham-based National Sperm Bank has struggled to attract donors and admitted it only had nine donors registered with it last year.

Women who wish to donate eggs should be no older than 35. The eggs are taken during a short operation at either an NHS or private medical clinic. 

Once the eggs have been ‘harvested’, they are fertilised with sperm before being placed into the birth mother.

Before the eggs are taken, donors are put on a course of drugs to synchronise the menstrual cycle with the woman who will receive them. 

The procedure can be done at a private clinic or the NHS but the clinic must again be licensed by the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority.

The donor can expect to be paid £750 plus expenses for her eggs. 

As with sperm donation, offspring born since April 2005 have a legal right to find out who donated the eggs once they reach the age of 18 – but they will not be the legal mother.

A spokesperson for the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority says: ‘Taking eggs is an invasive procedure but a wonderful opportunity to help others wishing to have a family. 

‘Eggs are usually collected using ultrasound guidance while you are sedated, with a hollow needle attached to a probe that collects the eggs.’

FURTHER INFORMATION 

For further details and information on donating sperm or eggs, contact the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority, 020 7291 8200, hfea.gov.uk

Support is also offered by charity Infertility Network UK, (01424 732361), infertilitynetworkuk.com.






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Parents-to-be could be nudged to take life cover to encourage planned finances

31 Mar 16
alibhai
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  • Health visitors may start ‘nudging’ pregnant mothers to consider insurance
  • It may become law for workers to be told about how to plan their finances
  • Critics warn unscrupulous firms may use it to push pricey products 

Pregnant women could be prompted to take out life insurance by their health visitors as part of a major drive to encourage people to plan their finances.

Government agencies, companies and employers may be required by law to give workers ‘nudges’ at key stages in their lives.

This could include when they are starting a family or approaching retirement, according to a report by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Parents-to-be could be asked to think how they would support their family if they lost their job or became ill

Parents-to-be could be asked to think how they would support their family if they lost their job or became ill

Under the changes, parents-to-be could be asked to think how they would support their family if they lost their job or became ill.

It’s not clear how this will work, but health visitors might ask new parents to consider insurance to cover any missing income.

Alternatively, leaflets highlighting cover might be included in information packs routinely given to new mothers when they leave hospital. 

Lenders may also be required to ask customers taking out a mortgage to consider how repayments will be covered if they die or become ill.

A taskforce will consider the most effective way of introducing the ‘nudges’. But critics warned unscrupulous firms might try to push poor value deals to customers. 

The FCA says firms would have to stick to tight rules that bar them from mis-selling products. 

Under new plans parents-to-be may be asked by health workers what their future financial plans are

Under new plans parents-to-be may be asked by health workers what their future financial plans are

This news comes as a report released earlier this show showed that one in four breadwinners don’t have life insurance, leaving their families with a cover gap of £263 billion if they died.

The sum works out at around £31,000 per person, with 8.5 million people in this situation, according to the study by the Association of British Insurers.

Most people buy life insurance when they reach a key stage in their life, such as buying a home, getting married or having children.

It is there to pay out a lump sum to your dependents should you die unexpectedly and can be used to cover payments such as your mortgage or other everyday costs. 

There are two main types to choose from; level-term life insurance which pays out a set amount, say £200,000, if you die within a set time frame, such as 25 years.

The other main type is decreasing term life insurance which is cheaper and pays out a sum that falls over time if you die, for example to pay off your mortgage.






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Top 10 freebies from free satnav on your mobile to a £2 insurance policy

31 Mar 16
alibhai
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Living the good life doesn’t have to cost the earth. Thanks to the internet, there are now dozens of ways to get things for free. 

Here, we round up ten of our favourite deals.

Free cinama tickets: The Meerkat Movies club entitles you to two-for-one cinema tickets every week for 12 months on Tuesday or Wednesday at major chains

Free cinama tickets: The Meerkat Movies club entitles you to two-for-one cinema tickets every week for 12 months on Tuesday or Wednesday at major chains

FREEBIE CINEMA TICKETS

If you use comparison site Compare The Market to buy an insurance policy, switch energy firms or take out a credit card, you can join its Meerkat Movies club.

This entitles you to two-for-one cinema tickets every week for 12 months on Tuesday or Wednesday at major chains including Cineworld, Odeon and Vue. To qualify, you need only buy a £2 one-night travel insurance policy.

Once you’ve done this, you can sign in to your account and claim your first voucher within 48 hours. Just take this along with you to the cinema.

SATNAV ON YOUR MOBILE

Most modern mobile phones have a built- in location-finding GPS system, so you needn’t buy an expensive satnav.

This is particularly useful if you are going abroad as car hire companies in Europe charge drivers as much as £100 to rent a satnav for a two-week trip.

The free app Navmii will navigate in more than 90 countries. Make sure to download it before you go. You don’t need to be connected to the internet to use it, so you won’t be hit with a shock phone bill.

17 YEARS’ WORTH OF FREE MUSIC

If you’ve bought CDs or vinyl records from Amazon in the past 17 years, you can access this music online for free.

Log on to amazon.co.uk, click on ‘your account’ at the top right of the web page and then select ‘your music library’.

Then choose ‘purchased’ on the left of the screen and a list of songs should appear.

If your children have a Blue Peter badge, they can visit more than 200 attractions including Thorpe Park and Legoland for free

If your children have a Blue Peter badge, they can visit more than 200 attractions including Thorpe Park and Legoland for free

VISIT THEME PARKS FOR FREE

If your children have a Blue Peter badge, they can visit more than 200 attractions including Thorpe Park and Legoland for free.

To get a badge, they need to write a letter telling Blue Peter about something they have created — such as a cake or model — and send pictures.

To apply, they must be aged between six and 15. Click here for more details and to apply online.

Or write to Blue Peter at MediaCityUK, Salford M50 2BH.

REWARDS FOR SHOPPING AT IKEA

The Swedish furniture chain is running a free prize draw for customers until April 17. Prizes range from a 60p hot dog to a £1,000 gift card.

To enter, simply swipe your Ikea Family card at the till — you can pick up one for free in the store. The competition is running at Ikea stores, excluding Croydon, Tottenham and Norwich.

CASHBACK FOR YOUR UNIFORM

If you wear a uniform to work — even if it’s only a branded T-shirt — you could reclaim hundreds of pounds in tax to pay for washing and repairs, according to a tip from website Money Saving Expert.

The rebate is worth up to £24 a year — and you can claim for the past four years. Call 0300 200 3300 and request a P87 form. Or fill in the form online.

You’ll need to provide details of your job, employer, PAYE reference and National Insurance number. Post forms to Pay As You Earn, HM Revenue & Customs, BX9 1AS and write ‘repayment claim’ on the envelope.

If you are successful, your tax code will be changed, so you don’t have to keep claiming.

GET FREEBIES BY TESTING FOR TESCO

Customers willing to test and review products for companies can nab scores of free samples.

Supermarket giant Tesco trials its goods with two consumer groups. Tesco Home Panels sends out skincare treatments, clothes and household cleaners to trial.

The Orchard at Tesco gives out vouchers so you can try groceries at a hefty discount or for free.

To sign up, visit tescohomepanels.com and orchard.tesco.com — you must be a member of the Tesco Clubcard scheme.

BE TREATED TO A BIRTHDAY MEAL OUT

A host of restaurant chains offer birthday freebies if you sign up for their newsletters.

Prezzo will give you a free bottle of prosecco if you visit on the day. Visit Prezzo website for a voucher.

Frankie & Benny’s has a birthday club offering discounts on meals — go to Frankie & Benny’s website to join.

FREE FILMS AND TV FOR TWO MONTHS

Free trials: You can sign up for a one-month trial with an online movie service such as Netflix or Amazon Prime

Free trials: You can sign up for a one-month trial with an online movie service such as Netflix or Amazon Prime

Sign up for a one-month trial with an online movie service such as Netflix or Amazon Prime to watch films and TV programmes for free.

For Amazon Prime, visit amazon.co.uk/gp/prime to sign up.

You’ll need to set up an account and then click on ‘start your 30-day free Prime trial’. Once that has run out, visit netflix.com and select ‘join free for a month’. Do remember to cancel your membership before the trial is up.

If you don’t you will end up paying £5.99 a month for Netflix and £79 a year for Amazon.

FREE TASTECARD DEALS FOR A MONTH

A Tastecard gives you 50 per cent off at more than 7,000 restaurants — some with Michelin stars. It costs £79.99 a year, but you can try the service for a month for free.

Just visit tastecard.co.uk/trial and enter your details. A card should arrive within seven days.

No bank details are taken, so you don’t need to remember to cancel any payments. 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW EACH WEEK: LISTEN TO THE THIS IS MONEY PODCAST 

 






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Trudeau to discuss horror scenario during U.S. trip: terrorists using nuclear weapons

30 Mar 16
alibhai
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Justin Trudeau will be among the world leaders gathering to contemplate the spine-chilling scenario of terrorists getting hold of nuclear weapons.

The prime minister will be in Washington this week at the last of the nuclear-safety summits organized by President Barack Obama.

The leaders will close out the two-day event with a session that discusses a hypothetical nuclear-terrorism scenario.

But that imaginary case study will be happening amid unnerving real-life events.

Belgium has just deployed soldiers to defend its nuclear facilities — after terrorist attacks in that country, and several incidents involving site personnel.

Analysts believe al-Qaeda and Japan’s Aum Shinrikyo have actively pursued nuclear weapons and they’ve begun expressing concern the so-called Islamic State might have similar designs.

“A terrorist attack with an improvised nuclear device would create political, economic, social, psychological and environmental havoc,” said Laura Holgate, a White House aide who oversees efforts to limit the threat from weapons of mass destruction.

“The impact of a nuclear terrorist attack would be global, and the solutions must therefore also be global.”

It’s the fourth such summit and flows from a speech President Barack Obama gave in Prague soon after he took office.

He expressed hope for a world without nuclear weapons — which he conceded might not be achievable in his lifetime.

But the 2009 speech set shorter-term targets. One was securing the existing nuclear material around the world; he convened international leaders’ meetings to make it a high-level priority.

The mixed results will be underscored by some glaring absences this week.

The Pakistani and Belgian leaders will be home dealing with the after-effects of terrorist attacks.

Russia’s Vladimir Putin is skipping the summit — he’ll be represented by observers. Russia says the U.S.-led process has run its course, and the issue should be left to the five international organizations working on it, including the UN, Interpol and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

As Obama leaves office, U.S. officials said the final summit communiqué will announce next steps leaders intend to take within those five organizations.

The Obama administration points to several successes these last few years:

— Enough fissile material to make 130 nuclear weapons has been removed or downgraded from 50 facilities in 30 countries.

— Fourteen countries and Taiwan have eliminated all nuclear material from their territory.

— Twenty countries have increased co-operation to counter nuclear smuggling.

But 2,000 metric tons of weapons-usable material remain in civilian and military programs, says the White House.

It would require 25 kilograms of highly enriched uranium to produce a nuclear bomb, former State Department official Sharon Squassoni told a briefing at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Numerous incidents involving nuclear-plant-staff have been reported just in Belgium.

A guard at one facility was shot dead in his home last week — although authorities say it wasn’t terrorism-related.

Security badges were just stripped from workers at a Belgian plant.

Video footage of an official at a Belgian facility was discovered in the home of a suspected militant linked to killers from the Nov. 13 Paris attacks.

Belgium’s nuclear agency had its computer system hacked and briefly shut down this year.

Two employees at a plant near Brussels reportedly joined jihadists in Syria. One was killed, another arrested.

A new study cites three potential ways terrorists could launch a nuclear attack.

They could attack facilities — perhaps by hacking their computers, says the study for the Harvard Kennedy School.

They could explode a so-called dirty bomb involving radioactive waste, which might not kill anyone but, the study says, could cause billions in damage.

The hardest to pull off would be the most devastating: an actual nuclear weapon in the hands of terrorists.

“The consequences of detonation of even a crude terrorist nuclear bomb would be severe, turning the heart of a modern city into a smouldering radioactive ruin and sending reverberating economic and political aftershocks around the world,” said the study.

Canada is deemed to have a better-than-average track record on nuclear safety.

Canada is third among 24 countries for the safety of its materials, according to an international non-profit organization that tracks nuclear-security trends.

It scored above-average in 18 different categories, like on-site protection and cyber security, according to the 2016 Nuclear Threat Initiative’s security index.

But it was middle-of-the-pack in two categories: dispersal of quantities and sites, and in potential terrorist presence.

“We are committed to working with the international community to prevent nuclear terrorism — a very real social, political, economic, and environmental threat,” Trudeau said in a statement.

Also on The Globe and Mail



Obama jokes about beer and hockey during Trudeau’s welcome to White House
(The Globe and Mail)

Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Trudeau should thank Chrétien and Harper for saving him from fundraising fiascoes

30 Mar 16
alibhai
10 comments



This is The Globe’s daily politics newsletter. to get it by e-mail each morning.

POLITICS BRIEFING

By John Ibbitson ()

Justin Trudeau should be grateful to both Jean Chrétien and Stephen Harper, whose political finance reforms freed him from the accusations that bedevil Liberals in British Columbia and Ontario.

As The Globe’s , donors are paying up to $20,000 a head for the privilege of intimate get-togethers with British Columbia’s premier. In Ontario, cabinet ministers are given fundraising targets, according to , that can reach as high as $500,000 per minister.

Politicians in both provinces insist that such privileged access has no impact on their decision-making, and perhaps they believe that in their hearts. But we are all experts in human nature, and we know that people who donate money in exchange for privileged access expect something in return.

That may be why, mere hours after the news of cabinet fundraising targets hit the tablet, Ms. Wynne was promising new laws to limit corporate donations.

In Quebec, former Liberal deputy premier Nathalie Normandeau faces bribery and corruption charges, part of a scandal involving government contracts allegedly linked to political donations. But at least Liberal Premier Philippe Couillard could point to new laws, implemented by the Parti Québécois government in 2013, that limit donations to political parties to $100 a year.

Other provinces, to varying degrees, limit or ban corporate and union donations. But in Ontario donation limits are sky-high and in B.C. nonexistent. Pressure is building in both provinces to rein in the influence of Big Money.

At the federal level, money bought influence from Confederation until the early 2000s. Pacific Railway. Customs and Excise. Beauharnois. Sponsorship.

That last misadventure, involving fake sponsorship contracts and kickbacks to the Liberal Party from advertising firms, pushed Mr. Chrétien to limit corporate and union donations to federal political parties. Stephen Harper further tightened the rules by lowering the limit for personal donations and banning corporate donations entirely. The era of the Ottawa bagman has ended.

That doesn’t mean interest groups don’t seek to influence public policy in Ottawa. As , a record number of registered lobbyists met with the new government in February, hoping to convince cabinet to see things their way.

But those lobbyists have only the art of persuasion available; the silent poison of financial services rendered no longer lingers in the air.

The Liberals in B.C. and Ontario don’t even need to study the issue. They simply need to take the federal law and declare: Here as well.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS MORNING

By Chris Hannay ()

> Jean Lapierre, a former federal cabinet minister and popular personality in Quebec media, has along with other members of his family. Read for more on his colourful career.

> Foreign Affairs Minister if Canada didn’t make combat vehicles for Saudi Arabia, a country with a notoriously poor human rights record, someone else would. “This argument that if we don’t do it somebody else will do it I find, frankly, the least convincing. It is not infused with moral, ethical values,” said Louise Arbour, a former Supreme Court judge and United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

> Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives in Washington tonight for a nuclear summit that will, among other things, discuss what could happen if .

> In Calgary yesterday, Mr. Trudeau said the Liberals would monitor the new that targets just a dozen regions of the country. “Reviewing and monitoring means exactly that – looking at how the programs and the significant help that we put out in this budget, not just for the hard-hit areas, but for the entire country, actually translates into better jobs and better opportunities for Canadians,” he said.

> The Bank of Nova Scotia held a $7,500-per-person fundraiser for two Ontario Liberal cabinet ministers just before the lucrative privatization of Hydro One, . The Toronto Star has more on , the party’s chief fundraiser.

> And the long road for , who returned from the Gulf War with post-traumatic stress disorder so severe he couldn’t read and now has successfully defended a master’s thesis on soldiers transitioning to civilian life.

SECUREDROP

Did you know you can share information with Globe journalists with much more security and anonymity than traditional means? Read more about and encrypted communication.

WHAT EVERYONE’S TALKING ABOUT

“When it comes to foreign policy, Conservatives did realpolitik for a fantasy world, and Liberals prefer fantasy policies for the real world. On Tuesday, Foreign Affairs Minister Stéphane Dion set out to describe the difference – or at least to set out a principle that will guide him in managing foreign policy, Justin Trudeau-style. In the end, he got stuck in a familiar place: the murky corner where principles meet national interests.” – (for subscribers).

: “Canadians should take a moment to reflect on a fundamental truth concerning government spending: Of all the expenditures governments make on our behalf, infrastructure spending is probably the most susceptible to political corruption and manipulation for partisan political purposes.”

: “The demographic imbalance [of Sikh ministers in the Liberal cabinet] carries a domestic political risk. The more numerous, disaffected non-Sikh Indo-Canadians are open to recruitment by the Conservatives. But the bigger risk is stepping on the minefield of the extremely sensitive domestic Indian politics and damaging bilateral relations with this key country being courted by many other countries.”

: “But now we are faced with a new prime minister who comes to Alberta, clearly recognizes the deep crisis facing the province, loosens EI rules for the hardest-hit areas, talks to the people most affected and pleads for other Canadians to show friendship and understanding rather than hostility.”

: “Still, if Canada has permanently done away with a formal deputy for the prime minister, it’s worth asking (if only for formality’s sake): Who would Trudeau call his second-in-command?”

Welcome to the Globe Politics newsletter! what you think.


Courtesy: The Globe And Mail

Half of us will attempt a DIY job this Easter with no idea what we’re doing

24 Mar 16
alibhai
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  • Student falls through rotten ceiling when trying to fix a leaking pipe
  • A third of those who start DIY jobs have no idea what they’re doing
  • Most DIY jobs take two years to finish when you don’t pay a professional

As the Easter weekend approaches and many of us get set for DIY projects, 33 per cent have admitted they have started a job before with no idea what they’re doing.

A further 50 per cent said they would rely solely on videos from YouTube if embarking on a DIY job around the house, according to research from Allianz share exclusively with This is Money.

The most common DIY jobs being attempted are; internal painting, putting together flat packed furniture and putting up shelves.

Whereas the three jobs people are most likely to pay for a professional to complete are; repairing the central heating, plastering and roofing.

Student Tom Gatens (pictured) tried to fix a leaky roof with his housemate Alex O'Farrell but ended up falling through the ceiling in the process

Tom Gatens fell through the ceiling of his rented home when attempting to fix a leaking pipe with his housemate rather than calling in a professional

Student Tom Gatens (pictured) tried to fix a leaky roof with his housemate Alex O’Farrell but ended up falling through the ceiling in the process

On average most of the 2,000 people asked by the insurer, said it took two years to complete a DIY job they’ve done themselves.

In one in five cases the DIY job was abandoned and a professional was called in to complete the job and 51 per cent of those asked said they currently have unfinished jobs around the house.

Apart from the cost of getting a botched job repaired, 15 per cent of people said they had injured themselves or someone else and 30 per cent said they had caused an accident because they weren’t wearing the right protective clothing.

It’s not just their own homes people are damaging either and one in 10 said they have caused damage to other people’s homes while carrying out DIY.

Student Alex O’Farrell, 22, told us about a nasty shock he had when trying to fix a DIY problem in his rented home with his housemate.

‘There had already been a few problems in the house with damp and water leaks and each time this had happened before I called our landlord to come over and fix it,’ he explains.

‘We were all away one weekend and got back on the Sunday to find the wallpaper in my housemate’s bedroom looking damp and bubbly. 

‘The boiler is in the roof so we assumed something was leaking and that was causing the problem,’ he says.

Instead of calling in a professional he went to B&Q to buy some tools and sealant to sort the issue out along with his housemates.

‘On heading into the attic with a torch my more nimble housemate Ben (pictured above) took three or four steps towards the problem and there was a thunderous bang as he fell through the ceiling.

‘Luckily he managed to grab onto two beams in the ceiling and I pulled him out with the help of a friend pushing him from below.

‘Tom looked scared for his life and did not find the situation funny at all – while we were in stitches and managed to get a photo of him.’

All-in-all the cost of the damage was around £400-£500 and Alex’s landlord then had to call a professional to come over and fix the damage.

In one in five cases a DIY job has been abandoned and a professional was called in to complete the job

In one in five cases a DIY job has been abandoned and a professional was called in to complete the job

David Watkins, Allianz’s head of property claims, said: ‘DIY enthusiasts should always make sure that they have the correct tools, safety equipment and the knowledge they need to safely complete improvements to their homes.

‘We strongly recommend if you’re not confident to complete the task yourself, call in a professional. We encourage people to take good care of their homes but it is important they know what they are doing as mistakes can be very costly.’

If you’re planning on undergoing a DIY job this weekend it’s worth checking first if your home insurance will protect you should something go wrong.

Home insurance is designed to look after your property and belongings should they be damaged or stolen.

Buildings insurance, covers the structure and fittings of the property while contents protects your belongings.

DIY accidents – you burst a pipe when trying to fix the boiler, for example – will usually be covered under a buildings insurance policy. 

However, always check first because with contents insurance, accidental damage is usually sold as an add-on and doesn’t come as standard.

For more information on how to find a cheaper policy see out article on cutting home insurance costs.






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Buy As You View to hand out £939k after crackdown by the regulator

24 Mar 16
alibhai
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  • Firm uses a prepayment meter to cut customers TV line if they don’t pay
  • Around 59,000 customer will receive compensation from Buy as You View
  • The regulator said it didn’t set out fees fairly to customers

Thousands of households that have bought electronics and furniture through a weekly payment scheme could be in line for compensation after a regulator crackdown. 

Dunraven Finance Ltd, which trades under the name Buy as You View, rents out items on hire purchase. This includes televisions that use a prepayment meter, which switch off if the customer misses a payment. 

Around 59,000 customers are due compensation payouts totalling £939,000 after the firm was found guilty of unfair practices. 

The regulator said the company did not set out its fees clearly to customers, it didn’t treat customers who were in arrears fairly and the firm’s assessments of customer’s credit worthiness were not robust enough.

The hire purchase company has agreed to pay compensation to customers by the end of 2016

The hire purchase company has agreed to pay compensation to customers by the end of 2016

The firm, based in Bridgend in South Wales, has agreed to pay the compensation by the end of 2016.

A full rebate for failed direct debit charges will be paid out to 58,232 customers totalling £706,000 through a cheque or balance adjustment.

The fees charged when customers took out a refinancing agreement will also be returned and 1,610 customers will receive a split of £74,000.

These fees were usually between £30 and £45 for what was called a ‘Fresh Start Refinance’ plan and customers who paid these fees between November 2012 and March 2014, when they were removed, will receive redress.

Customers who paid one fee for multiple items rather than separate charges for each, which typically would have been cheaper, may also be in line for a refund. A total of 3,877 customers had these plans, which were called ‘modifying agreements’.   

Those who bought items in this way may not have been aware they were paying more.

The firm says it will be getting in contact with these customers to see if these agreements, sold between 1 April 2014 and 1 August 2015, have caused them to suffer financial detriment and each customer will be treated on a case-by-case basis.

The company says it has made a number of changes to the way it operates.

The regulator says BAYV must compensate because it didn't treat them fairly or make fees clear

The regulator says BAYV must compensate because it didn’t treat them fairly or make fees clear

BAYV said in a statement it had been collecting payments via a prepayment meter since 1972, in a similar way to energy companies.

The meter is connected to the customer’s TV and historically it was ‘temporarily interrupted’ when a ‘suitable payment or arrangement’ was made.

BAYV will continue this practise, however It has confirmed it will now issue a default notice at least 14 days before cutting off a customer’s TV access if payments are missed.

From April 2014 the company stopped charging customers for refinancing arrangements and from 1 September 2015 it stopped applying fees when customers missed direct debit payments.

In October 2015 an ‘independent Skilled Person’ was appointed to monitor how the firm planned to address these complaints.

The hire purchase film used to cut customers off if they missed a payment on a TV agreement 

The hire purchase film used to cut customers off if they missed a payment on a TV agreement 

BAYV will start contacting those affected within the next two weeks so customers do not need to do anything and it has set up a page on its website giving further information to customers at www.bayv.co.uk/help/faq.

Jonathan Davidson, Director of Supervision – Retail and Authorisations at the FCA said: ‘We are pleased that BAYV is working with us to address our concerns.

‘It is important that firms meet our standards, including carrying out proper creditworthiness assessments and making sure that those in difficulty are treated fairly. We will continue, when necessary, to take action against inappropriate behaviour.’

Graham Clarke, chief executive officer at BAYV, said: ‘We have worked closely with the FCA in recent months to address these issues and I am sorry to any of our customers who may have experienced difficulties as a result of us not achieving the high standards we set ourselves.

‘We have gone further than the recommendations in the review by making additional changes to our operations. As we continue on our transformational journey, our aim is to be the most responsible lender in the sector.’






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

Using your washing machine at night could cost you your life

24 Mar 16
alibhai
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  • Government is working with power firms to fit a smart meter in every home
  • They will help gas suppliers to charge different rates at different times
  • This could make it considerably cheaper to run appliances at night

Millions of lives will be put at risk by plans to offer all families cheaper energy during the night, firefighters say.

To help people cut their energy bills, the Government is working with power companies to fit a ‘smart meter’ in every home. 

As well as recording how much energy you use every half-hour, smart meters will help gas suppliers to charge different rates at different times of day.

Scroll down for video 

Disaster: A burnt-out washing machine in Cheshunt, Herts. The Chief Fire Officers Association says it was never consulted on plans to offer all families cheaper energy during the night

Disaster: A burnt-out washing machine in Cheshunt, Herts. The Chief Fire Officers Association says it was never consulted on plans to offer all families cheaper energy during the night

Families will see prices fall when demand drops and rise at peak times. This could make it cheaper to run appliances such as washing machines, tumble dryers and dishwashers at night.

However, Money Mail has learned fire experts have serious concerns about the idea. The Chief Fire Officers Association says it was never consulted on whether it is safe to do so. 

It warns that running electrical appliances while you are asleep will put your family at greater risk of being trapped by fire.

Andy Reynolds, electrical safety expert for the association, says: ‘Never leave a tumble dryer, washing machine or dishwasher running when you have gone to bed or have left the house unoccupied.

‘If it is absolutely necessary to run one of these appliances during sleeping hours, then there should be sufficient working smoke alarms correctly sited to alert sleeping occupants.

‘Everyone in the household should know what the escape plan is in the event a fire breaks out.’

Energy experts also reacted with horror at the idea. Mark Todd, marketing director at price comparison site Energyhelpline, says: ‘It’s unbelievable customers are being told to run appliances at night to save money.

‘No one appears to have consulted the fire service.

‘Everyone in the energy industry advises it and the Government likes it as it spreads out usage meaning we need fewer power stations, but running appliances at night puts you at an increased risk of being trapped in a burning building as you sleep.’

As well as recording how much energy you use every half-hour, smart meters will help gas suppliers to charge different rates at different times of day

As well as recording how much energy you use every half-hour, smart meters will help gas suppliers to charge different rates at different times of day

About two million people are signed up for a tariff called Economy 7, which offers cheap overnight energy. Prices are typically slashed for seven hours from 11pm, midnight or 1am.

For decades, people using Economy 7 have been advised to take advantage of this by running washing machines and dishwashers when they are in bed. Now this sort of pricing could be rolled out to millions of families nationwide.

More than a million smart meters have been installed and the Government wants them to be in every household by 2020.

The scheme will cost taxpayers £11 billion, but its backers hope to generate savings of £17 billion by encouraging people to be more energy-efficient.

Smart Energy GB, the national campaign for the devices, says they ‘are paving the way for a more energy-efficient future’.

Earlier this month, the National Infrastructure Commission, which advises the Government, said the meters would allow families to ‘manage demand for electricity in response to price signals’.

‘They might do this themselves or use automated systems to ensure their appliances operate at the most cost-effective times of day,’ it continued.

The country’s biggest energy suppliers are united in wanting to charge different prices throughout the day. In industry jargon, this is called a time-of-use tariff. British Gas has already tested a scheme that charges more in the day and less at night.

It raised electricity prices by 99 per cent between 4pm and 8pm in the trial with Northern Powergrid and the University of Durham and cut them by 31 per cent at night.

British Gas says on its website that time-of-use tariffs will mean you being charged less for electricity ‘if you can wait a few hours’ to do your washing.

The accompanying video promises that moving the time of one load of washing a week ‘can make a difference to your electricity bill’.

EDF has tested its version of the tariffs, Economy Alert. A study by university Imperial College said it should be ‘offered to everyone’ if it helps to improve efficiency.

A trial by Npower found that time-of-use charges persuaded nearly 90 per cent of people to run their washing machine at a different time of day.

Experts warn that running electrical appliances at night will put you at greater risk of being trapped by fire

Experts warn that running electrical appliances at night will put you at greater risk of being trapped by fire

Claire Maugham, director of policy and communications at Smart Energy GB, says: ‘Time-of-use tariffs will be an essential part of managing our future national energy supply by enabling energy use at off-peak times.

‘It will be every consumer’s choice whether they use one of these tariffs, and we should all carry on following fire safety advice in our homes, whatever energy tariff we’re on.

‘Britain’s smart meter roll-out has been designed with the consumers at its heart, including safety measures such as a carbon monoxide check on all gas appliances in your home as part of the installation.’

A British Gas spokesman says: ‘We have no plans to trial or launch any time-of-use tariffs that offer cheaper electricity at night.’

The firm says it is instead hoping to offer free electricity between 9am and 5pm on Saturday or Sunday. EDF would not comment and Npower did not respond. 

 






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online

One in five of us is cold called every day – despite stricter laws and Government crackdown

24 Mar 16
alibhai
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  • 20% of us get a cold call every day from a claims management company
  • Insurer says we should be able to opt in to get these calls
  • Most calls are to do with payment protection insurance and motor claims
  • We are as stressed and worried by cold calls now as we were in 2013 

One in five of us receive a cold call every day from a claims management company (CMC), according to a new report.

The majority of these calls are to do with payment protection insurance, motor claims such as for a whiplash injury, and accidents in a public or work place.

These companies are ‘bombarding people with cold calls, emails, letters and text messages’ and ‘clearly contributing to be the bane of many people’s lives,’ according to a new report from Axa.

Cold callers: The reasons claims management companies are making nuisance calls

Cold callers: The reasons claims management companies are making nuisance calls

Around half of the 2,131 consumers asked by Axa said they think the regulations around CMCs need to be significantly tightened up.

Two thirds think cold calls from CMCs should be made illegal, and 55 per cent said they had seen no difference in the number of calls from CMCs they received in the past year.

A quarter said they felt stressed by calls from CMCs and 44 per cent were concerned about how the companies had got their details.

Amanda Blanc, chief executive officer for Axa, says people are still under ‘constant attack’ from CMC communications and ‘remain as worried and stressed by them now as they were back in 2013’.

This is despite several attempts by the Government to curb how they act, with record fines and stricter laws.

Blanc says ‘bad apples continue to rot the barrel and wreck the privacy and peace and quiet of millions of UK households’.

When asked about capping the fees CMCs charge, two thirds were in favour of a cap of between six and 10 per cent.

A cap on the amount CMCs can charge consumers if they win a case is also under review by the Ministry of Justice. 

CMCs take a percentage of the outcome as fees, which is usually around 30 per cent, but there are no caps on these.

Axa says we are still under ‘constant attack’ from CMC calls, texts and letters

Axa says we are as worried and stressed by CMCs now as we were in 2013

Axa says we are still under ‘constant attack’ from CMC calls, texts and letters and are as worried and stressed by them now as we were in 2013 

Another way to reduce the number of cold calls would be to make it mandatory for companies to show the numbers they were calling from and almost half – 49 per cent – of those asked were in favour of this.

The Department of Culture, Media and Sport, is currently looking into how this could be implemented.

Putting a time limit on when consumers can claim back compensation after an event was also suggested and 66 per cent agreed with this idea and said there should be a 12-month limit.

One in five of us, or around 12 million people in the UK, receives a cold call every day from a claims management company

One in five of us, or around 12 million people in the UK, receives a cold call every day from a claims management company

More than half of those asked were also in favour of medical rehabilitation being paid instead of cash for insurance claims.

Several reforms were made by the Ministry of Justice last June to the way CMCs are regulated but Axa’s report suggests these have had little effect.

Between April 2014 and December 2015, the Claims Management Regulator (CMR) issued 459 warnings, carried out 685 audits, started more than 150 investigations into specific firms and suspended 159 company licences.

Two examples of these fines were the £220,000 for The Hearing Clinic in August 2015 and £570,000 for Swansea’s Rock Law Ltd.  

There are currently 1,689 CMCs registered in the UK, a slight fall from 1,752 in the previous report.

Axa recommends a cap of 10 per cent in the fees CMCs charge, making it mandatory for callers to show their phone numbers, and banning automated voicemail calls.

It also said CMCs should only be allowed to call during business hours, and the Government should consider allowing consumers to opt-in to be called by CMCs.

Blanc says: ‘We feel that the time is ripe to take a vice-like grip on this industry, so as to improve people’s lives for the better by significantly reducing cold calls and the like and by weaning people tempted to pursue a false claim off this fraudulent and misguided activity.’

This news comes after an announcement in the Budget last week that the authorisation of CMCs would soon move to the Financial Conduct Authority and all CMCs will need to reapply for authorisation.

Martin Milliner, general insurance claims director for LV=, said: ‘We wholeheartedly support the news that the FCA is to regulate Claims Management Companies – this is a measure we called for in our CMC consultation response.

‘However, for it to be effective we urge the Government to ensure that the regulator is not just ‘another name over the door’; the FCA needs more funding and resourcing than the Claims Management Regulator received under the Ministry of Justice.

‘With greater powers there should be greater enforcement and the FCA should introduce larger fines and have the ability to criminalise the behaviour of rogue CMCs that are the heartbeat of our compensation culture.’ 

HOW TO REDUCE NUISANCE CALLS AND TEXTS 

  • Register with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS). If you are registered with the TPS and still receive calls, you can complain to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) on 0303 123 1113 
  • If you are with EE, O2 or Vodafone you can forward spam texts to 7726. If you’re a Three user, text 37726.
  • Set up call barring – many cold calls come from abroad, so you could ask your phone operator to block calls from international numbers. 
  • Don’t respond to spam texts. Even texting the word ‘stop’ alerts the sender that the phone is active and in use. If you do receive spam texts, you can report them to your network provider or to the ICO. Note the number – if possible get the cold call phone number (for example through dialing 1471). This helps organisations such as Ofcom to investigate. 
  • Screen calls – if you have caller display and an answer phone, consider only answering calls from numbers you recognise. 
  • Don’t answer unsolicited emails or return unrecognised calls as again you will be letting the company know your details are ‘live’.

  






Courtesy: Daily Mail Online